Intensive Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP)

In order to effectively treat adolescents and parents struggling with substance use or abuse, Southwest Family Guidance Center has created a comprehensive suite of programs and services under an overarching structure and strategy known as “ISAP.”

Every client is unique. Not every referral shares the same drivers, barriers or needs. That is why each candidate for our Intensive Stance Abuse Programs is thoroughly assessed by licensed clinicians utilizing leading assessment formats and systems, responding to the referral behaviors and relevant issues revealed during the intake process. Based on findings of the clinical assessment process, a treatment plans is formulated which may recommend concurrent or consecutive involvement in one, two, or a combination of programs, tailored to the needs of each client.

ISAP Treatment Flowchart

  • Who Qualifies For Our Intensive Substance Abuse Programs? At Southwest Family Guidance Center, our focus is not on just treating the individual, but the entire system affected by substance use. Any family member (parent or child) who is struggling with substance use or addiction may qualify for one or more of our Intensive Substance Abuse Programs. During the intake process we complete multiple…  MORE >

    Who Qualifies For Our Intensive Substance Abuse Programs?

    At Southwest Family Guidance Center, our focus is not on just treating the individual, but the entire system affected by substance use.

    Any family member (parent or child) who is struggling with substance use or addiction may qualify for one or more of our Intensive Substance Abuse Programs. During the intake process we complete multiple assessments to determine the appropriate treatment course for the referred individual, and potentially for others in the family who are impacted by the substance use.

    After a referral is received, we begin by performing a Clinical Assessment.

  • PRIMARY ASSESSMENTS Biopyschosocial & Comprehensive Assessment Our licensed clinicians conduct a biological, psychological and social assessment with each incoming client. As a trauma-informed agency, the use of this measure comes from a belief that a person’s overall health is best understood through a combination of biological, psychological and social factors. All these domains play a…  MORE >

    PRIMARY ASSESSMENTS

    Biopyschosocial & Comprehensive Assessment
    Our licensed clinicians conduct a biological, psychological and social assessment with each incoming client. As a trauma-informed agency, the use of this measure comes from a belief that a person’s overall health is best understood through a combination of biological, psychological and social factors. All these domains play a significant role in human functioning, and the accurate and effective assessment of the “whole picture” will contribute to the development of treatment recommendations most appropriate for the client.

    In some cases it may be necessary to complete a more thorough assessment that includes: review and integration of collateral documents from outside agencies, multiple interviews with client, and family member interviews.


    SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS

    Adverse Childhood Experience Scale (ACES)
    The ACES Assessment was created by the Center for Disease Control & Prevention as a tool to identify the number of adverse childhood experiences that are present. “Childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity.” (Center for Disease Control) Adverse Childhood Experiences have been linked to risky health behaviors, chronic health conditions, low life potential, and early death. As the number of adverse childhood experiences increases, so does the risk of negative outcomes.

    The survey measures 10 types of childhood trauma. Five are personal: physical abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional neglect. Five are related to other family members: an alcoholic parent, a mother who’s a victim of domestic violence, a family member in jail, a family member diagnosed with a mental illness, and the disappearance of a parent through divorce, death or abandonment.

    https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/

    American Society Of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)
    The ASAM is a multidimensional tool that was developed as a holistic, biopsychosocial measure for individuals struggling with alcohol and substance use. Screening for alcohol and/or drug misuse is critical to the prevention and early intervention of addiction. For those at risk of developing a serious problem with drinking or drugs, the identification of early warning signs can be enough to change negative drinking or drug use habits. For others, these assessments are important first steps toward treatment of and recovery from addiction.

    ASAM’s treatment criteria provide separate placement criteria for adolescents and adults to create comprehensive and individualized treatment plans. Adolescent and adult treatment plans are developed through a multidimensional patient assessment over five levels of treatment that are based on the degree of direct medical management provided, the structure, safety and security provided and the intensity of treatment services provided.

    The ASAM criteria are the most intensively studied set of addiction placement criteria in the United States and Europe. Research began in 1994, and between 1994-2006, the US federal government, through NIAAA, NIDA and CSAT, contributed about $6 million to its research validation. This allowed the first edition of the criteria to undergo testing for feasibility, reliability and predictive validity.

    http://www.asam.org

    Child And Adolescent Needs And Strengths Assessment (CANS) 
    The Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) assessment is a multi-purpose tool developed to support care planning and level of care decision-making, to facilitate quality improvement initiatives, and to allow for the monitoring of outcomes of services.

    The CANS was developed from a communication perspective to facilitate linkage between the assessment process and the design of individualized service plans including the application of evidence-based practices.

    The CANS is well-liked by youth and families, providers and other partners in the services system because it is easy to understand and does not necessarily require scoring in order to be meaningful to a child and family.

    The CANS has demonstrated reliability and validity and is auditable and audit reliabilities demonstrate that the CANS is reliable at the item level. Validity is demonstrated with the CANS relationship to level of care decisions and other similar measures of symptoms, risk behaviors, and functioning.

    http://praedfoundation.org

    Systemic Domestic Violence Assessment
    It is important to accurately assess for the presence of any domestic violence in a client’s system. Domestic Violence is an oftentimes undisclosed and misdiagnosed act that can be occurring between intimate partners (parents/caregivers), siblings or other family members within the client’s family system. While substance use does not cause domestic violence, there is a statistical correlation between the two issues. 61% of domestic violence offenders also use/abuse substances. (National Coalition Against Domestic Violence). Studies show that abusers tend to abuse drugs, and victims will tend to use drugs and alcohol.

    With a focus on improving functioning in all areas of the client’s life, it is important to understand the dynamics of all the relationships within the family context. Our clinicians will not only assess for the existence of intimate partner violence, but will also look for any occurrences of violence or aggression in the home. By identifying the drivers to any aggression and/or violence, we will be able to develop an individualized treatment plan that will address the specific needs of the client and family.
  • Brief Seven Challenges For Treatment & Assessment In order to secure a client’s interest and buy-in on a course of treatment, or when an assessment indicates that a lower level of intervention is required, a brief version of the Seven Challenges used in our Adapted IOP program can be particularly helpful. Brief Challenges is designed as a…  MORE >

    Brief Seven Challenges For Treatment & Assessment

    In order to secure a client’s interest and buy-in on a course of treatment, or when an assessment indicates that a lower level of intervention is required, a brief version of the Seven Challenges used in our Adapted IOP program can be particularly helpful. Brief Challenges is designed as a short-term intervention to provide an assessment of drug and co-occurring problems, brief therapy interventions for drug problems, and support in responding to external pressures for abstinence.

    Brief Seven Challenges sessions support a client in evaluating their life, including the use of alcohol and other drugs. Delivered in four individual sessions, the counselor does not exaggerate the dangers of alcohol or other drugs, nor will they try to convince the client to change their behavior. Instead, the sessions are geared to support the client in making their own choices. The counselor will work to assist the client consider the big picture of what has been happening in the client’s life—what is going well and what is not going well—and engage them in determining the best treatment going forward.

  • Adapted IOP: Intensive Outpatient Program With Additional Flexibility Our adapted Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) using the Seven Challenges Model for youth with substance use/abuse concerns focuses not only on the individual in recovery but also the whole family system impacting the client. It encourages change of behavior, provides family and individual education about substance use/abuse,…  MORE >

    Adapted IOP: Intensive Outpatient Program With Additional Flexibility

    Our adapted Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) using the Seven Challenges Model for youth with substance use/abuse concerns focuses not only on the individual in recovery but also the whole family system impacting the client. It encourages change of behavior, provides family and individual education about substance use/abuse, and introduces relapse prevention. The program focuses on learning how to make positive life changes and choices, supporting group services outside of the program, and encouraging family involvement.

    What should I expect from IOP?

    •  Youth will attend group sessions two times a week
    • Parents will participate in group therapy once a week
    • Youth, and parents if appropriate, will participate in at least one individual and/or family therapy each week
    • If clinically indicated, youth and family may also be assigned a care coordinator/case manager for up to 10 hours of case management.
    • Many adolescents may also choose to attend a support group such as A.A. or N.A.
    • All services are provided by licensed mental health counselors in a safe environment

    Who should attend IOP?

    • Adolescents from ages 13–18 years old who want to live an alcohol or drug free lifestyle
    • Families who are concerned about their teenager’s drug or substance use
    • Adolescents & families willing to participate in an intensive program that can for four months to one year

    About Seven Challenges

    The Seven Challenges is an evidence-based, comprehensive counseling program for youth with drug, alcohol and other problems. It is designed to motivate youth to evaluate their lives, consider changes they may wish to make, and then succeed in implementing those changes. It supports youth to taking control of their own rehabilitation.

    The Seven Challenges approach is unique and more effective because it does not assume or assert that the youth should abstain from the use of drugs and alcohol, but instead helps them take a complete and honest inventory of why they use, and the positive and negative effects of these behaviors. A youth who is able to make their own determination that the behavior should be changed is far more likely to have the ability to make the change in a lasting and sustainable manner.

    The Seven Challenges approach is designed to help youth look at what is happening in their lives, recognize what is going well and what is problematic. As youth go through this model, the “challenge process” is used to help them make thoughtful decisions in their life, including about drugs and alcohol.

    In the group, young people address their drug problems, co-occurring life skill deficits, as well as situational, social and psychological challenges. Counselors provide a structure and framework for individual sessions, the content of each session is not scripted, but flexible to the immediate needs of youth. “We do not fit the youth into our program; rather, we wrap the program around the concerns of the youth we serve.”

    The Seven Challenges Are:

    1. We decided to open up and talk honestly about ourselves and about alcohol and other drugs.
    2. We looked at what we liked about alcohol and other drugs, and why we were using them.
    3. We looked at our use of alcohol and other drugs to see if it has caused harm or could cause harm.
    4. We looked at our responsibility and the responsibility of others for our problems.
    5. We thought about where we seemed to be headed, where we wanted to go, and what we wanted to accomplish.
    6. We made thoughtful decisions about our lives and about our use of alcohol and other drugs.
    7. We followed through on our decisions about our lives and drug use. If we saw problems, we went back to earlier challenges and mastered them.
  • Adult Seeking Safety Group SWFGC utilizes the Seeking Safety model in an Adult Substance-Use Education Group to provide treatment to adult caregivers whose substance use and/trauma may be impacting or driving the maladaptive behaviors of youth or other members of the family. There is a strong connection between individuals with substance use disorders and those…  MORE >

    Adult Seeking Safety Group

    SWFGC utilizes the Seeking Safety model in an Adult Substance-Use Education Group to provide treatment to adult caregivers whose substance use and/trauma may be impacting or driving the maladaptive behaviors of youth or other members of the family.

    There is a strong connection between individuals with substance use disorders and those who also suffer from Trauma. Researchers found that over two-thirds of individuals who were in treatment for a substance use disorder also reported having one or more traumatic life events (Beck et al., 2000).

    The Seeking Safety Model is an evidence-based, trauma-informed, present focused therapy model to help people attain safety from trauma and/or substance use. This model’s effectiveness stems from a direct focus on trauma and substance use without requiring the participant to focus directly on the details of their specific trauma. This allows an individual with PTSD or other trauma, but also with an avoidant-coping style, to move forward in treatment.

    The key principles of the Seeking Safety model are:

    • Safety as the overarching goal (helping clients attain safety in their relationships, thinking, behavior, and emotions).
    • Integrated treatment (working on both trauma and substance abuse at the same time)
    • A focus on ideals to counteract the loss of ideals in both trauma and substance abuse
    • Four content areas: cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, case management
    • Attention to clinician processes (clinicians’ emotional responses, self-care, etc.)
    • SWFGC utilizes the Seeking Safety model in an Adult Substance-Use Education Group to provide treatment to adult caregivers whose substance use and/trauma may be impacting or driving the maladaptive behaviors of youth or other members of the family.
  • Multisystemic Therapy: Contingency Management Adaptation The Multisystemic Therapy (MST) standard model of delivery is an evidence-based treatment model that engages both the client directly and greater social systems they operate within: family, school, work, and community. MST for Substance Use, also known as MST Contingency Management (MST-CM) is an MST adaptation proven effective with youth…  MORE >

    Multisystemic Therapy: Contingency Management Adaptation

    The Multisystemic Therapy (MST) standard model of delivery is an evidence-based treatment model that engages both the client directly and greater social systems they operate within: family, school, work, and community. MST for Substance Use, also known as MST Contingency Management (MST-CM) is an MST adaptation proven effective with youth with substance use and abuse issues.

    MST-CM builds on the strong foundation of MST treatment principles, with additional supports to increase caregiver monitoring skills and youth drug/alcohol-refusal skills. The MST-CM Therapist works closely with caregivers to develop specific plans that are designed to keep the youth from abusing substances. Caregivers are taught how to spot and track drug and alcohol consumption, deliver drug testing to their youth, identify positive supports for the youth/family in the community and how to effectively monitor their child. Youth receive specialized training in drug/alcohol-refusal skills and are connected to positive peers and prosocial activities.

    Qualifications For This Program Include:

    • Youth ages 12—17 who abuse substances (marijuana, alcohol, cocaine, etc.)
    • Has multiple arrests/is a chronic offender
    • Is deeply involved with delinquent peers
    • Is experiencing problems at school or doesn’t attend at all
    • Is currently, or has a recent history of being, a runaway
    • Demonstrates, or has demonstrated, physical aggression in more than one setting
    • Is covered by Medicaid. MST does not currently take private pay or commercial insurance
    • Has at least one adult member of the family willing to take part in services

    What Can Be Expected:

    • Treatment provided in the home and the community
    • Time-limited treatment of 3–5 months
    • Therapist available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
    • Flexible schedules to accommodate the needs of the family
    • Tailored treatments for the unique needs of the family and its members
    • Therapists with small caseloads to facilitate multiple weekly sessions if needed
  • Thriving Kids® Parenting Program Thriving Kids is a 16-week intensive parenting curriculum designed to improve overall family health and success. The program is trauma-informed, developmentally informed and based on the latest research and work in interpersonal neurobiology. Our mission is to deliver an intensive training program that increases empathy, enhances parenting skills, and contributes to the health, happiness…  MORE >

    Thriving Kids® Parenting Program

    Thriving Kids is a 16-week intensive parenting curriculum designed to improve overall family health and success. The program is trauma-informed, developmentally informed and based on the latest research and work in interpersonal neurobiology. Our mission is to deliver an intensive training program that increases empathy, enhances parenting skills, and contributes to the health, happiness and safety of every family member.

    Families that can benefit:
    • Families with an open case with Child Protective Services
    • Families at risk of Child Protective Services involvement
    • Court-referred families
    • Families with a child in out-of-home placement
    • Families working toward reunification

    What the program includes:
    • Individual Therapy
    • Family Therapy
    • Group Therapy (psycho-education and process therapy)
    • Parenting & Life Skills Coaching
    • Case Management (if appropriate)

    Ongoing Individual & Family Therapy is available for participants of the Thriving Kids Parenting Program, if needed.

  • Sandoval County Juvenile Drug Court Program Southwest Family Guidance Center is the treatment provider for the Juvenile Drug Court Program in Sandoval County. With an emphasis on trauma-informed care, the Sandoval County Juvenile Drug Court Program is designed to address the individual needs of youth who struggle with drug and alcohol abuse. The program utilizes multiple interventions including: drug testing, individual/family/group…  MORE >

    Sandoval County Juvenile Drug Court Program

    Southwest Family Guidance Center is the treatment provider for the Juvenile Drug Court Program in Sandoval County. With an emphasis on trauma-informed care, the Sandoval County Juvenile Drug Court Program is designed to address the individual needs of youth who struggle with drug and alcohol abuse. The program utilizes multiple interventions including: drug testing, individual/family/group counseling, youth support services, regular court appearances, and educational opportunities. Both the Sandoval Country Drug Court and Adapted IOP Programs utilize the Seven Challenges treatment model.

    ABOUT SEVEN CHALLENGES

    The Seven Challenges is an evidence-based, comprehensive counseling program for youth with drug, alcohol and other problems. It is designed to motivate youth to evaluate their lives, consider changes they may wish to make, and then succeed in implementing those changes. It supports youth to taking control of their own rehabilitation.

    The Seven Challenges approach is unique and more effective because it does not assume or assert that the youth should abstain from the use of drugs and alcohol, but instead helps them take a complete and honest inventory of why they use, and the positive and negative effects of these behaviors. A youth who is able to make their own determination that the behavior should be changed is far more likely to have the ability to make the change in a lasting and sustainable manner.

    The Seven Challenges approach is designed to help youth look at what is happening in their lives, recognize what is going well and what is problematic. As youth go through this model, the “challenge process” is used to help them make thoughtful decisions in their life, including about drugs and alcohol.

    In the group, young people address their drug problems, co-occurring life skill deficits, as well as situational, social and psychological challenges. Counselors provide a structure and framework for individual sessions, the content of each session is not scripted, but flexible to the immediate needs of youth. “We do not fit the youth into our program; rather, we wrap the program around the concerns of the youth we serve.”

    The Seven Challenges

    1. We decided to open up and talk honestly about ourselves and about alcohol and other drugs.
    2. We looked at what we liked about alcohol and other drugs, and why we were using them.
    3. We looked at our use of alcohol and other drugs to see if it has caused harm or could cause harm.
    4. We looked at our responsibility and the responsibility of others for our problems.
    5. We thought about where we seemed to be headed, where we wanted to go, and what we wanted to accomplish.
    6. We made thoughtful decisions about our lives and about our use of alcohol and other drugs.
    7. We followed through on our decisions about our lives and drug use. If we saw problems, we went back to earlier challenges and mastered them.
  • Individual & Family Therapy After assessment, it is sometimes determined that an identified client, or specific family members impacted by the clients substance abuse, receive their own individual therapy. This decision is made collaboratively with the client and family to offer individualized support, or to address specific drivers that may impede their ability to reduce, eliminate, or abstain from substance use.…  MORE >

    Individual & Family Therapy

    After assessment, it is sometimes determined that an identified client, or specific family members impacted by the clients substance abuse, receive their own individual therapy. This decision is made collaboratively with the client and family to offer individualized support, or to address specific drivers that may impede their ability to reduce, eliminate, or abstain from substance use.

    SWFGC is equipped to provide clinical services to children, adolescents, and families in Albuquerque, Corrales (serving Rio Rancho & Sandoval Counties), Los Lunas, Santa Fe, and Las Cruces. We have a clinical staff of over 120 therapists, all of whom are licensed Masters- or Doctoral-level clinicians, possessing a variety of specialities.

  • Addiction Medical Services Southwest Family Guidance Center has a strategic partnership with professional and licensed providers for the treatment and management of special addiction services including: Medication Management Detox Adult Intensive Outpatient (IOP) Southwest Family Guidance Center will coordinate collaborative care and manage the collection and compiling of treatment updates and reports that stakeholders may require.…  MORE >

    Addiction Medical Services

    Southwest Family Guidance Center has a strategic partnership with professional and licensed providers for the treatment and management of special addiction services including:

    • Medication Management
    • Detox
    • Adult Intensive Outpatient (IOP)

    Southwest Family Guidance Center will coordinate collaborative care and manage the collection and compiling of treatment updates and reports that stakeholders may require. Southwest Family Guidance Center will include addiction service treatment providers in regular treatment team meetings to ensure a best practices continuity of care throughout treatment.

  • Case Management For Additional Services & Case Coordination Southwest Family Guidance Center provides up to 10 hours of community based care coordination/case management for clients and/or families that require additional support. This may include assisting the coordination of health, social, education and other services that would assist the client or family. Utilizing a trauma-informed perspective, case managers assess the client’s needs and…  MORE >

    Case Management For Additional Services & Case Coordination

    Southwest Family Guidance Center provides up to 10 hours of community based care coordination/case management for clients and/or families that require additional support. This may include assisting the coordination of health, social, education and other services that would assist the client or family.

    Utilizing a trauma-informed perspective, case managers assess the client’s needs and strengths, develop individualized treatment plans, advocate for needs and monitor the client’s progress.  Care coordinators are actively involvement in treatment team meetings in order to ensure continuity of care and to help inform other providers of important details that may impact treatment.

  • Program Completion, Discharge & Sustainability As clients approach the end of treatment, the status of treatment goals will be assessed and plans developed to help the client and family sustain gains in a post-treatment environment. Sustainability planning can include: Safety Plans IF/Then Plans Aftercare Resources In specific cases, there may exist a need for reunification of family members.…  MORE >

    Program Completion, Discharge & Sustainability

    As clients approach the end of treatment, the status of treatment goals will be assessed and plans developed to help the client and family sustain gains in a post-treatment environment.

    Sustainability planning can include:

    • Safety Plans
    • IF/Then Plans
    • Aftercare Resources

    In specific cases, there may exist a need for reunification of family members. This may be at the direction of CYFD or other outside stakeholder, or may just include family members all involved in the care of a previously identified “at risk child.” Reunification steps are developed collaboratively within the team, and will include outside stakeholders when appropriate.